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Critical Care

Everyday, Canadian physicians, nurses and paramedics make quick, life saving decisions in order to help restore normal physiological functions in patients in emergency situations. Due to the demanding and critical nature of their work, they must have complete confidence in the safety and efficacy of the plasma protein products used to treat their patients.

    Octapharma's Critical Care portfolio in Canada is comprised of innovative high-quallity plasma protein products for stabilizing blood circulation and restoring coagulation function in emergency settings.

    We support Canada’s critical care teams through a series of educational tools and programs. We also work with Canadian physician and nurses advisory panels composed of thought leaders in the areas of Critical Care and Hematology to ensure our initiatives are both relevant and meaningful. We also support the important work done by our patient advocacy groups.

    Conditions commonly treated with critical care plasma products

    Large Volume Exchange Procedures

     

    In individuals with TTP or HUS, an important plasma protein is either missing or dysfunctional, leading to the uncontrolled formation of small platelet clots (thrombi). The initial symptoms can be subtle and nonspecific, which includes a general feeling of being unwell, fever, headache and sometimes diarrhea. As the conditions progress, small blood clots are formed throughout the blood vessels and platelets are consumed causing a low platelet count. Patients may experience spontaneous bruising, as well as confusion, numbness and rarely bleeding.

     

    The mainstay of treatment is daily plasma exchange that replenishes the missing plasma protein. This stops undesirable clot formation and aids in removal of disease-causing antibodies if they are present. Similarly, plasma is efficacious for treatment of deficiencies of Factors V, XI and XIII when a specific factor concentrate is not available or not appropriate. Other plasma options are now available. For more information, please talk to your local healthcare provider.

     

    Note: this content is for information only. For diagnosis and treatment, please consult your physician.

    Vitamin K deficiency due to Oral Anticoagulant Therapy (OAT)

     

    In 2007, an estimated 209,000 Canadian patients in publicly funded drug programs were on a long-term Oral Anticoagulant Therapy (OAT).1 OAT is commonly used in patients in many conditions, including mechanical heart valves, chronic atrial fibrillation, venous thromboembolism, acute myocardial infarction, stroke and peripheral arterial occlusion. The use of OAT is expected to increase, given the aging population.

     

    These patients are more likely to experience atrial fibrillation or venous thromboembolism, two of the most common conditions requiring OAT. OAT carries the inherent risk of hemorrhagic complications. These include excessive bleeding from various areas of the body, as well as less frequent but more serious complications such a gastrointestinal bleeds and intracranial hemorrhage.

     

    Treatment options are available for patients that exhibit major bleeding manifestations or require urgent surgical procedures.  


    1. CADTH report. 2007. Devices for Point-of-Care Monitoring of Long-Term Oral Anticoagulation Therapy: Clinical and Cost Effectiveness

     

    Note: this content is for information only. For diagnosis and treatment, please consult your physician.

     

    “...a portfolio of products designed to help restore normal physiological functions in patients in emergency situations”